[off-topic] Can anyone identify this invasive weed?


#1

I hate these things. I dig out 3-5 of them regularly everything I walk around the yard.


#2

What part of the country are you located?


#3

Located on the Gulf Coast of FL. Sarasota.

They grow year round, as far as I can tell.


#4

Never mind the weed. What’s all that cool green stuff in the background and the blue reflective area in the middle ?


#5

Appears to be in allium family. Does it have a white flower? Are the leaves rounded? It’s difficult to see from the photo.


#6

If the leaves are not rounded, but more like a blade of grass, then it may be in the Lazula family, Common names include wood rush.


#7

Sounds like we have a plantologist in our midst :nerd:

I may need to do one of these posts soon, I just moved into a new place and the yard is more weeds than grass. Feel like I can’t be a true Rachio employee with my yard looking like that…


#8

Plantologist–I like that. Just more of a garden geek. Master Gardener training requires a working knowledge of horticultural classification and plant taxonomy.

It keeps me out of trouble.:wink:


#9

The leaves are more pointed, but doesn’t match any of the images I got when googling Lazula.

Grows randomly in the plant beds. Sometimes entangles itself in a desirable plant/shrub root system.


#10

If the leaves are more grass-like, then it may be Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum).


#11

That’s pretty close… I’ve never let them grow to the point where they would flower. I’ll snap some more pictures next time I dig some out.

Thanks for helping out. Next step is to figure out why they are infesting my flower beds!!


#12

Looks like angle pod blue flag. It is a member of the iris family and is very invasive throughout the South. The usually flower.


#13

Ugh, I think we have a winner! Any advice on prevention or just keep after them daily like I have been?


#14

Let one of them flower and that would help identify the plant. Regardless of what it is, plants that grow from bulbs, tubers, or rhizomes are difficult to eradicate. Each one of the bulblets can produce a new plant. Digging them up is the best control, and good luck with that.:grin:


#15

Glyphosate should kill them, but i would read the label and check for safety next to ponds or lakes. Any plant with bulbs are nearly impossible to kill. Nutgrass does not have a bulb, but it comes back every year.


#16

But where do they come from and how are they multiplying in my flower beds?? Grrr… :triumph:

I found some more and left them in the ground… Pics:


#17

They are native to Florida and spread very easily. One bulb sends out runners and new babies sprout.


#18

Well that’s it then… Time to move! :wink:


#19

I have the same problem with wild violets and nutgrass. They just keep expanding.


#20

If you need help identifying the weed contact your local County Extension agent. They will be happy to help you.