App option for head layout and precipitation rate


#1

There has been a lot of conversation about precipitation rate (PR) and overlap. I understand that selecting nozzle types inputs a set PR in the run time calculations.

Does the existing app consider the overlap PR?

If not, I think being able to have a window in the app that allows the users to input head layouts, distance between them, and water pressure would be helpful in calculating overlap. Along with the other nozzle characteristics too. It could create a densogram showing the overlap and adjust the scheduling calculations accordingly to help prevent overwatering.

Rachio users are digging into their irrigation settings more than they every did before. They are finding out that irrigation is not just a set it and forget it system anymore. To conserve water, we have to actually pay attention to scheduling.


#2

Seems to me that an offline tool that you put that information into and then gives you a precip rate and a efficiency percentage would be the most valuable way of pulling that job off. I’d bet that a very small percentage of customers actually even take the time to read the material here and thus there is a bit of a user understanding bias that comes into play by reading the information here.


#3

And also its probably more so that people should be figuring all that stuff out and probably correcting issues in the system plan before putting the values into the tool… Because the lower the efficiency numbers are the more water it has to put town and waste to keep the dry spots up to par.

I’d bet most customers are all for saving water right up until the moment when saving more requires grabbing a shovel. :wink:


#4

You’re probably right. I know the customers I install controllers for have never even been to the forum. I always recommend them to come here to read or ask questions. Most of them just want to run the controller with their phone.

I agree. But that usually never happens.

Something else I see all the time too, my customers will get new turf or landscape and then call me out because something is dying. The landscaper never even consulted them on how good the plants will get water after the work is done. That’ll get me “wrapped around the axle!”

Then, I grab the shovel. :laughing:


#5

There is a reason why good irrigation experts can make a living doing the job. Because its more than just installation of a system that makes or breaks how well it works. A lot goes into proper design. I remember when I called my irrigation guy to get a quote I stated all the head types I wanted and how many I wanted and where I wanted them and showed all the planned precip rates and coverage efficiency… The guy actually thought I was one of his competitors trying to find out what his rates was… He was really surprised when I actually called him up to do the job (that’s how I found out that he thought I was one of his competitors).

Was even funnier when the utility guy came to do a performance survey after the fact so that I could get my rebates. The guy came out and did pretty extensive collection cup testing and did a full report. He’d said it was the most even coverage highest efficiency system he’d ever tested.

But honestly all it was was just using MP Rotator heads to their manufacturer specifications… They sure put water down slow but they do a good job of it… I’d started looking at nozzles and having to change sizes of nozzles based on the arc angle and all that jazz and it all makes sense but what a pain in the ass. I don’t envy you and I hope you’re compensated well for it!